Tag Archives: academic writing

How to write

I love my old friend Jonathan Mayhew’s prose. His blog, Stupid Motivational Tricks (Scholarly Writing and How to Get it Done), is often very charming (and it is always illuminating). Read this bit on the use of “scare quotes.” The … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , | Leave a comment

J. Hillis Miller

Professor Miller was a genial man whose ardent advocacy of the “deconstruction” movement in literary and cultural criticism was notable for his uncommonly graceful prose style. His early book “Poets of Reality” was a revelation to me my first year … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Free at Last

United States copyright law was changed repeatedly in the last century to grant copyright extensions to entire classes of works of literature and entertainment. This meant that such work could not be referenced at length in works of scholarship without … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , , , , | Leave a comment

10% and “the crisis in knowledge”

Writes Jonathan Mayhew: Knowledge is under attack from several fronts at once. In science itself, it is due to corporate corruption and the inherent bias toward interesting but possibly false results. There was that paper about how most scientific findings are false.  … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Good scholarly habits

My dear friend Tierney Wisniewski, this website’s cofounder and coeditor, has started up a new blog devoted to her scholarly work and how she gets it done. I love her inaugural piece, “Good Scholarly Habits.” Tierney writes with great clarity and … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Peers

Clarissa has a couple of words: In a way, the censorship in US academia is worse than the Soviet kind. The Soviet censors were mostly dumb, uneducated people, and it wasn’t all that hard to pull wool over their eyes … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , | Leave a comment

Transformative learning and student autonomy

No Contest co-founder Tierney Wisniewski has written a beautifully conceived and composed Master’s Thesis. Here’s the abstract. [I’ve added some paragraphing for ease of online reading, because abstracts by requirement are very, very fat.] Self-determination theory (SDT) is a well-established theory … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

No plagiarism foul

A super-smart student in my Advanced Professional Communications class asked me whether using an app that generates a citation for you in proper APA, MLA, Chicago style was plagiarism. My first thought was “I doubt it,” but in my line … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , , , , , | Leave a comment

Writing in the Sciences

“The more that you take care with your writing, the more you might explore uncertainties in your thinking,” suggests Stanford University Environmental Earth System Science Professor Julie Kennedy in this excellent Writing Matters video. Kennedy helpfully stresses the primacy of … Continue reading

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

The ‘Fuzzy Logic’ Man

“He always took criticism as a compliment,” said Stuart Russell, a Berkeley professor who worked next door to Mr. Zadeh for many years. “It meant that people were considering what he had to say.”

Posted in Robert's posts | Tagged , | Leave a comment